White Sox news, Minor Leagues updates and more

November 17, 2009

Sox Top 15 prospects by Kevin Goldstein [UPDATE]

Kevin Goldstein:

Four-Star Prospects
1. Daniel Hudson, RHP
2. Jared Mitchell, OF
3. Tyler Flowers, C
Three-Star Prospects
4. Jordan Danks, CF
5. Dayan Viciedo, 3B
6. Brent Morel, 3B
7. Clevelan Santeliz, RHP
8. Trayce Thompson, OF
Two-Star Prospects
9. Santos Rodriguez, LHP
10. David Holmberg, LHP
11. C.J. Retherford, 2B
Four More:

12. Jhonny Nunez, RHP
13. Josh Phegley, C
14. John Ely, RHP
15. Nathan Jones, RHP

from the Daniel Hudson section:

The Good: Hudson combines plus stuff with well above-average command. His 92-94 mph fastball can touch 96 and features good tailing action, and he throws strikes to both sides of the plate with it. His best secondary offering is a plus changeup that is a true swing-and-miss pitch, which lessens the concerns about his slingy, low three-quarters arm action.
The Bad: Hudson’s slider flashed average, but it is inconsistent. He’ll need to establish it more as a starter in the big leagues. He tends to work up in the zone and gives up fly balls. Despite the enormous leap forward, many scouts think he’s maxed out projection-wise.
Perfect World Projection: Even with Hudson’s tremendous growth in 2009, some scouts don’t see room for much more, seeing him as a good third starter at best. Others think he’d be even better as a late-inning reliever.

UPDATE: Here’s Goldstein chat. He believes in the improvement of Tyler Flowers’ defense at catcher.

November 6, 2009

‘A Minor Review of ‘09′ Sox edition

Filed under: Chicago White Sox,MiLB — The Wizard @ November 6, 2009 7:45 pm
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Marc Hulet looks at some prospects that probably won’t make it on their organization’s Top 10 prospects’ list. Here’s one:

The Riser: Santos Rodriguez, LHP

Obtained from the Braves in the Javier Vazquez deal, Rodriguez could turn out to be a steal. The hard-throwing reliever has a 90-95 mph fastball, as well as a slider and change-up. In ‘09, he allowed just 18 hits in 27 innings of work in rookie ball. The 21-year-old was old for the league but he got three games of experience in low-A ball before the year ended. He needs to improve his control after posting a walk rate of 5.67 BB/9 but his strikeout rate was excellent at 14.00 K/9.

More at the link.

October 2, 2009

A look at Kannapolis’ pitching staff

FutureSox:

Kannapolis, the Sox Low-A affiliate, put up a chubby 5.12 ERA in 2007. In 2008, it dropped more than a full point to 4.08. And here in 2009, it dropped 80 more points to 3.24, 2nd best in the South Atlantic League by just .01. They were also 2nd in strikeouts, 2nd in WHIP, and led the league with 15 shutouts. Not surprisingly they finished the season at 82-57, best record in the 16-team league, despite being below the median in most offensive categories. And the pitching staff that achieved this was filled mostly with players drafted or signed since the 2008 June draft, not much more than a year ago. …

September 25, 2009

Baseball America’s Top 20 Appalachian League Prospects Chat

Filed under: Chicago White Sox,MiLB — The Wizard @ September 25, 2009 2:36 pm
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Matt Eddy:

Joe LeCates (Easton, MD): Matt, I saw a report the other day identifying some similarities at the plate between Thompson and Mike Stanton. While that is intriguing to say the least, Thompson is obviously much more raw. That being said, how much of a project is he going to be in terms of learning to hit advanced pitching – what is a realistic expectation for his career path?

Matthew Eddy: Trayce Thompson is that rare player who won over league managers despite not really hitting a lick. You can see the potential in his frame and with his bat speed and his grace in the outfield. But in reality, he could be facing another assignment with Bristol next year to iron out his pitch recognition.

and

Trayce Thompson (Bristol): Remember, Mike Stanton hit .161/.226/.268 in his first pro season.

Matthew Eddy: This isn’t a question, but it is an appropriate place to wrap things up. It’s important at this level not to get to swept up in a player’s performance, great or poor. For the young first-year players, especially, they have so much development left in front of them that what they do over the course of their first 60-70 pro games is insignificant in the grand scheme of things.

Here’s the Trayce Thompson-Mike Stanton comparison. BTW, there are a couple questions about Brady Shoemaker, and one on Santos Rodriguez on the chat too.

Baseball America’s Top 20 Appalachian League Prospects

Filed under: Chicago White Sox,MiLB — The Wizard @ September 25, 2009 12:02 pm
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Matt Eddy:

6. David Holmberg, lhp, Bristol (White Sox)

Six-foot-4 and a bit soft-bodied, Holmberg has room to grow stronger and improve upon his present high-80s velocity. He sits at 86-88 mph and touches 90 from a straight overhand delivery, which aids him in getting good plane to the plate.  Quick hand speed enables Holmberg to spin quality 12-to-6 curveballs with above-average break and depth. He mixes in a plus changeup and throws an occasional slider. His secondary stuff and precocious feel for locating his pitches and for changing speeds marks him as a future mid-rotation candidate, particularly if he adds a few ticks to his fastball.

11. Trayce Thompson, of, Bristol (White Sox)

15. Santos Rodriguez, lhp, Bristol (White Sox)

Rodriguez features a plus-plus fastball during most outings, topping out at 97 mph and sitting at 95 with late movement. The pitch features incredible plane by virtue of his 6-foot-5 height, and Appy Leaguers struggled to lift the pitch, going homerless during his 27 innings. He throws a changeup with above-average arm speed that neutralizes righthanders. Despite his arm strength, Rodriguez still walks too many batters to rank as a surefire relief prospect, though his control improved as the season progressed. He also doesn’t have a usable breaking ball at this point, as his slider doesn’t consistently show enough tilt to be graded even as fringe-average.

For the full reports on all 20 prospects go to the link.

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